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The Privateersman
  • Language: en

The Privateersman

In this highly acclaimed free ebook (series introductory offer), first published in 2013, Dorset lad Tom Andrews escapes the hangman’s noose only to find himself shanghaied onto a Caribbean-bound privateering ship, before he and crewmate Joseph, escape to America carrying the ship's booty. They thrive in the vile corruptness of New York - a town fated to be on the losing side in the Revolutionary War. Betrayed and forced to return to Britain, they seek riches in the early industrial boom. Tom relishes money, but also secretly yearns for love and social standing. His hopes rise on meeting Lady Verity, the beautiful daughter of an impoverished aristocrat. To get you acquainted with the autho...

Lords and Communities in Early Medieval East Anglia
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 185

Lords and Communities in Early Medieval East Anglia

Investigation of the growing regional power of the English aristocracy in the central middle ages.

Negotiating secular and ecclesiastical power
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 196

Negotiating secular and ecclesiastical power

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1999
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  • Publisher: Brepols Pub

How was medieval Europe held together? People of dissimilar occupations and economic interests, living in widely separate parts of western Europe, came to recognise and act upon a common set of cultural beliefs. This framework of shared social customs and values, that is distinctively medieval and European, arose from the interaction between secular and ecclesiastical power, but these developments can no longer be convincingly viewed as arising solely from events such as the Wars of Investiture and the Fourth Lateran Council. The medieval mental framework was not solely concerned with the great struggles between Rome and lay rulers, but neither can we assume that local communities were islands of cohesion in a wider world of chaos and conflict. The case studies demonstrate how texts were used as weapons by ecclesiastical authorities in defining their relationships with lay powers; how land and kinship was used to define social relations between laity and clergy; and how conflicts were resolved.

Myth, Rulership, Church and Charters
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 286

Myth, Rulership, Church and Charters

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2017-03-02
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  • Publisher: Routledge

For more than forty years Nicholas Brooks has been at the forefront of research into early medieval Britain. In order to honour the achievements of one of the leading figures in Anglo-Saxon studies, this volume brings together essays by an internationally renowned group of scholars on four themes that the honorand has made his own: myths, rulership, church and charters. Myth and rulership are addressed in articles on the early history of Wessex, Æthelflæd of Mercia and the battle of Brunanburh; contributions concerned with charters explore the means for locating those hitherto lost, the use of charters in the study of place-names, their role as instruments of agricultural improvement, and ...

The Killing Man
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 320

The Killing Man

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1990-11-01
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  • Publisher: Penguin

Mike Hammer walks into his office to find his unconscious secretary on the floor, a brutally butchered corpse occupying his office chair, and a note from a murderer on his desk: “You die for killing me.” So begins a tough-as-nails tale of government assassins and renegade mobsters, told with the breakneck pacing and brutal impact of a freshly fired .45 bullet.

Anglo-Saxon England:
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 348

Anglo-Saxon England:

Anglo-Saxon England was the first publication to consistently embrace all the main aspects of study of Anglo-Saxon history and culture - linguistic, literary, textual, palaeographic, religious, intellectual, historical, archaeological and artistic - and which promotes the more unusual interests - in music or medicine or education, for example. Articles in volume 38 include: The Passio Andreae and The Dream of the Rood by Thomas D. Hill, Beowulf off the Map by Alfred Hiatt, Numerical Composition and Beowulf: A Re-consideration by Yvette Kisor, 'The Landed Endowment of the Anglo-Saxon Minster at Hanbury (Worcs.) by Steven Bassett, Scapegoating the Secular Clergy: The Hermeneutic Style as a Form of Monastic Self-Definition by Rebecca Stephenson, Understanding Numbers in MS London, British Library Harley by Daniel Anlezark, Tudor Antiquaries and the Vita 'dwardi Regis by Henry Summerso and Earl Godwine's Ship by Simon Keynes and Rosalind Love. A comprehensive bibliography concludes the volume, listing publications on Anglo-Saxon England during 2008.

Black Postcards
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 324

Black Postcards

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2009-05-01
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  • Publisher: Penguin

Offers a personal memoir about his band called Luna and his wife Brita Phillips including both his years of achievement and his bitter moments, and "self-inflicted wounds."

Money in the Medieval English Economy 973–1489
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 352

Money in the Medieval English Economy 973–1489

The importance of money as one of the key variables in the workings of the medieval economy is often overlooked. This new study first provides the reader with a background to the problems of modeling the medieval economy and the value of the Fisher equation of exchange to monetary historians, to the practical processes of striking coins from silver and gold acquired through foreign trade and to the importance of royal control over mints and exchanges. These theories are then used to analyze how money worked within the economy of the early, central, and late middle ages with fluctuations in the size of the circulating medium and the availability of credit acting as either a brake on or a stimulus to economic expansion. A full money economy did not emerge until c. 1300, but its existence and flexibility helped the economy survive the severe shocks of the late middle ages.